How to become a Non-Executive Director – Liverpool 4 June 2015

Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course.

non-executive director“A well structured and presented introduction to the responsibilities, challenges and attributes required of being a NED. It was thought-provoking. I have referred back to my copious comments in the comprehensive slide hand outs many times already”

Simon C Jones, Interim Transformation Leader and Hidden Value Discoverer

The How to become a Non-Executive Director course helps you to plan and prepare for your first NED position. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge.

This one-day interactive course is aimed at aspiring NEDs and covers essential knowledge about roles, responsibilities, strategy and corporate governance that are key foundations for a Non-Executive board role. It also considers up to date thinking on corporate governance and the responsibilities of owners, the board and employees.

This is followed by practical sessions on identifying NED opportunities, the process of obtaining a first appointment and performing due diligence before any position is accepted. There is emphasis on the importance of presenting your experiences with clarity and relevance.

This course identifies the various ways and circumstances in which non-executive directors can make an effective contribution to a board’s work. It also examines methods for their selection and reviews their motivation, induction and reward.

Who should attend?
Individuals who are currently a non-executive director; those seeking appointment as a non-executive director and those looking to appoint a non-executive director.

What to expect?

  • Clarifies how and why non-executive directors can strengthen a board
  • Provides practical guidance on how best to secure an appointment as a non-executive director

Course objectives
Participation on this course will provide you with the knowledge to:

  • Clarify the board’s role, purpose and key tasks
  • Appreciate the contributions that non-executive directors can make to the board in different types of company and situations
  • Recognise the qualities and experience needed to fulfil a non-executive director appointment
  • Appreciate appropriate methods for finding, selecting, appointing and rewarding non-executive directors
  • Understand the preparation required to interview for or be interviewed for the post of non-executive director

Course Leader: David Doughty CDir FIoD

David Doughty - Chartered DirectorThe course is delivered by David Doughty, a Chartered Director and highly experienced Non-Executive, Chief Executive, Chair, Entrepreneur and Business Mentor. David has extensive executive and non-executive experience in small and medium enterprises in private and public sectors. He is also a board level consultant to multi-national organisations and a Chartered Director Ambassador for the Institute of Directors. See his LinkedIn profile here: (http://uk.linkedin.com/in/daviddoughty)

Key Details
Duration: 1 day
Location:

Orleans House
Edmund Street
Liverpool
L3 9NG 

Price
£330.00 (ex VAT)

Payment with Booking Price

£300.00 (ex VAT)

Partner Discount Price*
£280.00 (ex VAT)

Book Now
To see course dates and to book your place now follow this link:

Course Registration
The fee includes lunch, refreshments and a copy of the course handbook

Attendance counts as 6 CPD hours of structured learning

*Discounts on Excellencia course fees are available for:

How to become a Non-Executive Director – Bristol 19 May 2015

Are you thinking of becoming a Non-Executive Director as part of a Portfolio Career or to develop your boardroom skills prior to taking up an executive director role?

non-executive directorJoin us on Tuesday, May 19 2015 to find out how you can become a Non-Executive Director.

“Excellent course giving a clear picture of the role, the skills and characteristics required, the range of NED opportunities and the various routes to secure such positions. As a bonus you also meet interesting people and useful contacts. A good career investment.”

Mark Lambert, Non-Executive Director

The How to become a Non-Executive Director course helps you to plan and prepare for your first NED position. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge.

This one-day interactive course is aimed at aspiring NEDs and covers essential knowledge about roles, responsibilities, strategy and corporate governance that are key foundations for a Non-Executive board role. It also considers up to date thinking on corporate governance and the responsibilities of owners, the board and employees.

This is followed by practical sessions on identifying NED opportunities, the process of obtaining a first appointment and performing due diligence before any position is accepted. There is emphasis on the importance of presenting your experiences with clarity and relevance.

This course identifies the various ways and circumstances in which non-executive directors can make an effective contribution to a board’s work. It also examines methods for their selection and reviews their motivation, induction and reward.

Who should attend?
Individuals who are currently a non-executive director; those seeking appointment as a non-executive director and those looking to appoint a non-executive director.

What to expect?

  • Clarifies how and why non-executive directors can strengthen a board
  • Provides practical guidance on how best to secure an appointment as a non-executive director

Course objectives
Participation on this course will provide you with the knowledge to:

  • Clarify the board’s role, purpose and key tasks
  • Appreciate the contributions that non-executive directors can make to the board in different types of company and situations
  • Recognise the qualities and experience needed to fulfil a non-executive director appointment
  • Appreciate appropriate methods for finding, selecting, appointing and rewarding non-executive directors
  • Understand the preparation required to interview for or be interviewed for the post of non-executive director

Course Leader: David Doughty CDir FIoD

David Doughty - Chartered DirectorThe course is delivered by David Doughty, a Chartered Director and highly experienced Non-Executive, Chief Executive, Chair, Entrepreneur and Business Mentor. David has extensive executive and non-executive experience in small and medium enterprises in private and public sectors. He is also a board level consultant to multi-national organisations and a Chartered Director Ambassador for the Institute of Directors. See his LinkedIn profile here: (http://uk.linkedin.com/in/daviddoughty)

Key Details
Duration: 1 day
Location:

Orchard Street Business Centre
14 Orchard Street
Bristol BS1 5EH

Price
£330.00 (ex VAT)

Payment with Booking Price
£300.00 (ex VAT)

Partner Price*
£280.00 (ex VAT)

Book Now
To see course dates and to book your place now follow this link:
Course Registration
The fee includes lunch, refreshments and a copy of the course handbook

Attendance counts as 6 CPD hours of structured learning

Attendance certificate provided after the course

*Discounts on Excellencia course fees are available for:

Realising your business assets – Bristol 14 May 2015

excellencia

It is never too soon to think about

clarke wilmott

Extracting value from your Business

Find out how you can get the most value out of your business with a business exit health check

Thursday 14 May 2015, Clarke Wilmott, 1 Georges Square
Bath Street Bristol BS1 6BA 5:00pm to 8:00pm

Come along to this Free event hosted by leading law firm Clarke Wilmott with corporate governance experts Excellencia, financial planning specialists LP Wealth Management and innovative investment company Octopus Investments to find out how you can secure your future when you leave your business.

If you are the owner of a growing business then this event will help you to understand how you can take steps now to ensure that you get the most out of your business when it is time to step down and what to do with your money once you have left.

Programme:

17:00 Registration and networking
17:30 Welcome from the Chair and introductions
Adding value to your business
DD150 David Doughty
Chartered Director, Chief Executive at Excellencia
17:50 Estate Planning for Business Owners Jane Halton Jane Halton
Partner Clarke Willmott LLP
18:10 Auto Enrolment and what it means for your Business Chris Lawson Chris Lawson
Director, LP Auto Enrolment Solutions Ltd
18:30 Retirement Planning for Business Owners Andrew King Andrew King and Damon FoxDamon
LP Wealth Management
18:50 Extracting surplus profits from your company tax efficiently  Dominique%20Butters Dominique Butters
Business Development, Octopus Investments
19:10 Refreshments and networking
20:00 Close
LP Wealth Although the event is free, places are limited – to book your place on-line now click here or e-mail debbie.wright@excellencia.co.uk octopus investments

How to become a Non-Executive Director – Manchester 28 April 2015

Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course.

non-executive director“A well structured and presented introduction to the responsibilities, challenges and attributes required of being a NED. It was thought-provoking. I have referred back to my copious comments in the comprehensive slide hand outs many times already”

Simon C Jones, Interim Transformation Leader and Hidden Value Discoverer

The How to become a Non-Executive Director course helps you to plan and prepare for your first NED position. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge.

This one-day interactive course is aimed at aspiring NEDs and covers essential knowledge about roles, responsibilities, strategy and corporate governance that are key foundations for a Non-Executive board role. It also considers up to date thinking on corporate governance and the responsibilities of owners, the board and employees.

This is followed by practical sessions on identifying NED opportunities, the process of obtaining a first appointment and performing due diligence before any position is accepted. There is emphasis on the importance of presenting your experiences with clarity and relevance.

This course identifies the various ways and circumstances in which non-executive directors can make an effective contribution to a board’s work. It also examines methods for their selection and reviews their motivation, induction and reward.

Who should attend?
Individuals who are currently a non-executive director; those seeking appointment as a non-executive director and those looking to appoint a non-executive director.

What to expect?

  • Clarifies how and why non-executive directors can strengthen a board
  • Provides practical guidance on how best to secure an appointment as a non-executive director

Course objectives
Participation on this course will provide you with the knowledge to:

  • Clarify the board’s role, purpose and key tasks
  • Appreciate the contributions that non-executive directors can make to the board in different types of company and situations
  • Recognise the qualities and experience needed to fulfil a non-executive director appointment
  • Appreciate appropriate methods for finding, selecting, appointing and rewarding non-executive directors
  • Understand the preparation required to interview for or be interviewed for the post of non-executive director

Course Leader: David Doughty CDir FIoD

David Doughty - Chartered DirectorThe course is delivered by David Doughty, a Chartered Director and highly experienced Non-Executive, Chief Executive, Chair, Entrepreneur and Business Mentor. David has extensive executive and non-executive experience in small and medium enterprises in private and public sectors. He is also a board level consultant to multi-national organisations and a Chartered Director Ambassador for the Institute of Directors. See his LinkedIn profile here: (http://uk.linkedin.com/in/daviddoughty)

Key Details
Duration: 1 day
Location:

Manchester One
53 Portland Street
Manchester
M1 3LF 

Price
£330.00 (ex VAT)

Payment with Booking Price

£300.00 (ex VAT)

Partner Price*
£280.00 (ex VAT)

Book Now
To see course dates and to book your place now follow this link:

Course Registration
The fee includes lunch, refreshments and a copy of the course handbook

Attendance counts as 6 CPD hours of structured learning

*Discounts on Excellencia course fees are available for:

Takeovers, Restructuring, and Corporate Governance (5th Edition)

For undergraduate and graduate courses on Mergers and Acquisitions, or as a supplement for Business or Corporate Finance, Economics, or Strategy

This book brings together conceptual and updated empirical material in a systematic way. It provides students with a basis for understanding mergers and acquisitions and corporate restructuring within the framework of strategic planning issues facing managers in all companies, small and large. The authors’ expertise combine to bring an unmatched dimension of reality to the text as they explain the merger and acquisition process. The book covers all areas of critical importance in understanding mergers and acquisitions In today’s economy as it:
Provides conceptual discussion on why mergers take place
Describes the arbitrage activity associated with mergers and acquisitions

Overcoming corporate short-termism: Blackrock’s chairman weighs in

By William A. Galston and Elaine Kamarck

BlackRock Chairman and CEO Laurence Fink speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, February 29, 2012. Fink, who heads the $3.51 trillion asset management firm BlackRock, was speaking at the Council on Foreign Relations and discussing a series of objectives with chief executive officers.

When the head of the world’s largest investment fund raises fundamental questions about U.S. corporations, we should all pay attention.

In a letter earlier this week to the Fortune 500 CEOs, BlackRock Chairman Larry Fink criticized the short-term orientation that he believes shapes too much of today’s corporate behavior. “It concerns us,” he declared, that “in the wake of the financial crisis, many companies have shied away from investing in the future growth of their companies. Too many have cut capital expenditure and even increased debt to boost dividends and increase share buybacks.” And he concluded, “When done for the wrong reasons and at the expense of capital investment, [returning cash to shareholders] can jeopardize a company’s ability to generate sustainable long-term returns.”

Fink is correct on all counts. In a new Brookings paper out today, University of Massachusetts economist William Lazonick states that the 454 companies listed continuously in the S&P 500 index between 2004 and 2013 used 51 percent of their earnings to buy back their own stock, almost all through purchases on the open market. An additional 35 percent went to dividends. “Buybacks represent a withdrawal of internally controlled finance that could be used to support investment in the company’s productive capabilities,” he said.

This is bad for the economy in two ways. As the growth of the U.S. workforce slows dramatically, economic growth will depend increasingly on improved productivity, must of which comes from raising capital investment per worker. Failing to make productivity-enhancing capital investments will doom our economy to a new normal of slow growth.

Many business leaders say that they are reluctant to make long-term investments without reasonable expectations of growing demand for their products. That brings us to the second way in which corporate short-termism is bad for the economy. Most consumer demand comes from wages. If employers refuse to share gains with their employees, growth in demand is bound to be anemic.

Although he clearly cares about his country, Fink is also acting as the steward of $4.8 trillion in investments. In an article published by McKinzie earlier this month, he warns that although the return of cash to shareholders is juicing equity markets right now, investors “will pay for it later when the ability to generate revenue in the long term dries up because of the lack of investment in the future.”

Unlike most other corporate leaders who express concerns about these developments, Fink is unwilling to rely on moral suasion alone. Because current incentives are so perverse, he argued, “It is hard for even the most dedicated CEO to buck this trend.” The constant pressure to produce quarterly results forces executives to go along—or risk losing their jobs. That pressure comes from investors who are, in Fink’s words, “renters, not owners, who are going to trade your stock as soon as they can pocket a quick gain.”

This logic leads BlackRock’s chairman to propose changing the tax code by lengthening to three years the the period needed to qualify for capital gains treatment while taxing trading gains at an even higher rate than ordinary income for investment held less than six months. To encourage truly patient capital, the capital gains rate would be stepped down to zero over a period of ten years.

We can argue the merits of this idea, and we should. But the main point should be beyond argument. We need more builders and fewer traders, more Warren Buffetts and fewer Carl Icahns. And to get them, we’re going to have to change the laws governing corporate and investor behavior. Fink has opened up a crucial debate, and it’s time for Congress and presidential aspirants to join it.

Authors

  • William A. Galston
  • Elaine Kamarck

Image Source: © Brendan McDermid / Reuters

From:: Overcoming corporate short-termism: Blackrock’s chairman weighs in

Stock buybacks: From retain-and reinvest to downsize-and-distribute

By William Lazonick

A man looks at a board showing graphs of Japan's stock price indexes outside a brokerage in Tokyo June 5, 2012. (Reuters/Toru Hanai)

Stock buybacks are an important explanation for both the concentration of income among the richest households and the disappearance of middle-class employment opportunities in the United States over the past three decades. Over this period, corporate resource-allocation at many, if not most, major U.S. business corporations has transitioned from “retain-and-reinvest” to “downsize-and-distribute,” says William Lazonick in a new paper.

Under retain-and-reinvest, the corporation retains earnings and reinvests them in the productive capabilities embodied in its labor force. Under downsize-and-distribute, the corporation lays off experienced, and often more expensive, workers, and distributes corporate cash to shareholders. Lazonick’s research suggests that, with its downsize-and-distribute resource-allocation regime, the “buyback corporation” is in large part responsible for a national economy characterized by income inequity, employment instability, and diminished innovative capability.

Lazonick also challenges many of the notions associated with maximizing shareholder value, an ideology that has come to dominate corporate America. Lazonick calls for a decrease, or even a ban, in stock buybacks so companies will be able to use these funds to finance capital expenditures but more importantly to attract, train, retain, and motivate its career employees. And some of the funds made available by a buyback ban can even flow to the government, he argues, as tax revenues for investments in infrastructure and human knowledge that can underpin the next generation of innovation.

Downloads

  • Download the paper

Authors

  • William Lazonick

Image Source: Toru Hanai / Reuters

From:: Stock buybacks: From retain-and reinvest to downsize-and-distribute

10 things Non-Executive Directors can do to satisfy their legal responsibilities

Falling foul of the law can have serious consequences for Non-Executive Directors – here are 10 steps you can take to avoid it happeningNED3

The 2006 UK Companies Act, which sets out the legal duties and responsibilities of Company Directors, is one of the longest pieces of legislation ever written. Falling foul of the law can have serious consequences for directors including personal and potential criminal liability yet many directors, particularly NEDs, take on their roles in blissful ignorance of the law.

Before becoming a company director you should have a basic understanding of your legal duties and responsibilities and you should check for indemnity provisions in the company articles of association and your Directors’ and Officers’ (D&O) insurance arrangements.

Once in post, here are 10 things you can do to avoid the potential pitfalls:

  1. Remember that compliance is the responsibility of all directors – not just the Company Secretary, Chair, CEO or other Executives.
    Whilst individual directors may have particular responsibility for the day-to-day mechanics of compliance, it is the board’s responsibility, collectively, to ensure that the statutory requirements are met. Filing annual returns and accounts may be the job of the Finance Director or Company Secretary but persistent failure to file on time can lead to penalties being imposed on all the other directors, including the NEDs. Make sure that the board receives regular assurance on compliance matters and do not assume it is being taken care of by the other directors.
  2. Check your status as a Company Director.
    Many Non-Executives start working with boards as advisors or consultants before they are formally appointed as NEDs and assume that as they are not registered as a company director at Companies House then the law does not apply to them. If you actively take part in board meetings or hold yourself out to be a director then you run the risk of being classified as a “shadow’ or “de facto’ director and thus share the same legal duties, responsibilities and liabilities as the other board members. Make sure that your legal status and that of the other board attenders is clear.
  3. Keep accurate records of board meetings.
    Every board meeting agenda should contain an item which gives directors the opportunity to review the minutes of the previous meeting. Make sure that you use this opportunity to make any corrections that are required to ensure that the minutes accurately record the discussions that took place together with any resolutions and actions. Pay particular attention to items where your personal contribution is mentioned. Keep your own copy of board minutes for at least six years after you have ceased to be a member of the board..
  4. Be aware of key statutory filing requirements.
    Make sure that you know when key documents such as the annual accounts and annual returns need to be filed. You can use the Companies House web-check facility to check that the business is up to date with its filing requirements. Also be aware of other matters such as certain shareholders’ resolutions, allotments of shares and the appointment of new directors, which need to be notified to Companies House within specified time limits.
  5. Familiarise yourself with the Articles of Association and other constitutional documents.
    One of the prime duties of a company director, as set out in the 2006 Companies Act, is to ‘act within powers’. These powers can be found in the company’s Articles of Association together with any shareholder agreements or contracts which form the constitutional documents for the business. As soon as you are appointed to a board you should read these documents and familiarise yourself with the specific requirements for the calling of a shareholders’ meeting or provisions relating to directors’ meetings and remuneration. The board should review the Articles on a regular basis to ensure that they are still relevant to the operation of the business
  6. Take all reasonable steps to avoid conflicts of interest.
    ‘Declaration of interest’ should be a standing agenda item for a board meeting, giving directors the opportunity to declare a personal interest in an item to be discussed at that meeting. There should also be a register of interests, reviewed annually, which records the external interests of board members and their immediate families. These are both particularly important for NEDs who are more likely to have external interests than the executives. However, simply declaring an interest is not necessarily all that a director has to do to avoid a conflict of interest. It may be appropriate to physically absent yourself from the board meeting for the duration of the discussion of a matter where you are conflicted and have this absence clearly recorded in the minutes. In some cases directors resign their posts and re-join the board once a conflicted matter has been resolved.
  7. Avoid accepting benefits from third parties.
    Taking a bribe from a potential supplier is clearly wrong but what about corporate hospitality? As with conflicts of interest, many boards keep a register to record gifts or hospitality given to directors or senior managers, usually above a set amount. They also have specific policies and procedures that directors should adhere to. The best advice though is not to accept anything, even a sandwich or cup of coffee if it could be interpreted as an inducement by a third party.
  8. Watch out for insolvency.
    After failing to file your statutory documents on time, the next most heinous crime a director can commit is ‘trading whilst insolvent’. A company is insolvent if it cannot pay its debts when they are due to be paid. Many businesses, especially start-ups or those with high growth can sail near to or actually become technically insolvent. They can then only continue to trade if they have a reasonable belief that they can trade out of their insolvent position. It is vital therefore, for the board to seek external advice from an insolvency practitioner as soon as possible in order that there is independent confirmation of the reasonableness of their position. Failure to act promptly and responsibly can leave directors open to unlimited personal liabilities.
  9. Speak out – do not ignore warning signs.
    If you have concerns about any company decisions, or the content of any documents such as accounts or board papers, make your views known. It is your duty to act with reasonable skill, care and diligence. The 2006 Companies Act does not differentiate between executive and non-executive directors – as a board member you are jointly and severally liable for all board decisions and can become personally liable if the board knowingly does something illegal.
  10. Get trained to become a company director.
    A Non-Executive Director appointment can be a very rewarding career move but it is not something that should be entered into lightly. In addition to performing due diligence on the business, a prospective NED should fully understand the duties and responsibilities of a company director.
    Excellencia provide a 1-day course for prospective NEDs (How to become a Non-Executive Director) for £330 (ex VAT)